Warrior Women: Moving Robe Woman (Thasina Mani)

Moving Robe Woman (1854 – c. 1931)

  • Moving Robe Woman was a member of the Hunkpapa Sioux.
  • She was also called Thasina Mani, Mary Crawler, Her Eagle Robe, She Walks With A Shawl, and Walking Blanket Woman.
  • Her father was Chief Crawler.
  • She was the sister of One Hawk or Deeds, a warrior killed at the start of the Battle of the Little Bighorn.
  • At the age of 17 she had taken part in a Sioux raid against the Crow, in Montana.
  • Moving Robe Woman gained fame when she rode alongside her father – against Lt. Colonel Custer – to avenge her brother’s death.
  • A brave named Fast Eagle claimed he held Custer’s arms while Moving Robe Woman stabbed him.  She was also credited with the death of a black soldier called Isiah Dorman.
  • Charging into battle this Warrior Woman rode a black horse, painted her face crimson, and braided her hair.
  • In an interview in 1931 she claimed, ” . . . I have not boasted of my conquests.  I am a woman, but I fought for my people.”

Sources:

AmericanTribes.com, “Mary Crawler,” at http://www.american-tribes.com/Lakota/BIO/MaryCrawler.htm

Geni.com, “Moving Robe Woman, Thasina Mani,” at https://www.geni.com/people/Moving-Robe-Woman-T%C8%9Fa%C5%A1%C3%ADna-M%C3%A1ni/6000000031182145889

Wikipedia, “Moving Robe Woman,” at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moving_Robe_Woman

Chief Sitting Bull (c.1831-1890)

Chief Sitting Bull

“The Great Spirit has given our enemies to us.  We are to destroy them.”

sitting-bull

  • Sitting Bull was named Jumping Badger at birth, but was nicknamed Slow because of his thoughtful nature.
  • This warrior was a Hunkpapa Lakota holy man, famous for resisting the U.S. government and its Manifest Destiny expansion.
  • During the Red Cloud war of 1866-1868 he led numerous war parties against the military.  He also made guerrilla attacks on prospectors and settlers encroaching on sacred Sioux lands.
  • This chief did not agree with the Treaty of Fort Laramie and refused to sign.
  • His continued resistance throughout the Great Sioux War (1876) at one point halted construction on the Northern Pacific Railway.
  • In a sun dance ceremony before the Battle of the Little Bighorn, Sitting Bull predicted the defeat of the Seventh Cavalry.
  • His leadership inspired this major victory against George Armstrong Custer’s troops.
  • To avoid the inevitable backlash, Sitting Bull fled to Canada, where he claimed political asylum until 1881.
  • This chief became a household name after starring in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show.  Here, he befriended Annie Oakley and named her Little Sure Shot.
  • Fearing he would join the dangerous Ghost Dance Movement, Sitting Bull was assassinated by Indian Agency Police in a botched attempt to arrest him.
  • His death was one of the precipitating factors that led to the Wounded Knee Massacre in South Dakota, 1890.  It marked the end of the Great Sioux Nation.

Sources:

History.com, “Ten Things You May Not Know About Sitting Bull” at http://www.history.com/news/10-things-you-may-not-know-about-sitting-bull

Mooney, James, The Ghost-Dance Religion and the Sioux Outbreak of 1890. Lincoln and London: University of Nebraska Press, 1991.

Wikipedia, “Sitting Bull” at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sitting_Bull